Death Threats

Death Threats

“I felt like the police were trying to talk me out of pressing charges as they didn’t seem to understand the gravity of the situation until we started getting death threats.”

‘Carole’, in Council housing, explains she was a victim of hate crime due to her religion and mental illness. If she was suffering with a mental health problem, she should have been classified as vulnerable and given additional support. However, she says that “a lot of the times I felt like the police were trying to talk me out of pressing charges as they didn’t seem to understand the gravity of the situation until we started getting death threats.”

She mentions mistreatment of her children to the point she removed them from school, vandalising her car and gardens, obstructing the road and shouting, swearing and name calling with reference to mental health and religion. She became a recluse and was suicidal for the last 4 weeks they lived in that house.

“I could not eat or sleep for fear. My children could not play outside. Eventually got moved because of the death threats. Now, 6 months on, I have only just started going out of my new house to get food shopping but take a 25 mile round trip to avoid bumping into these people. I still cannot sleep and have severe panic attacks. I’ve completely lost what little confidence I had. I just don’t want to be around people. I am fearful all the time. My youngest child will not leave my side and now wets the bed and wakes up screaming from nightmares. It is really devastating that people can behave in this way but yet we had to move from a home we loved.”

‘Carole’ awaits a court case which she is very anxious about but she is determined to speak out against those who have caused her such distress.

Hate Crime is a serious matter and should be reported to the Police. See here for a definition of hate crime.

 

hollie

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