Tag Archives: loud music

In it for the long haul

If you do report it to Environmental Health/Police do not expect things to happen quickly. Expect to be in it for the ‘long haul'” ‘James’, South Yorkshire

‘James’ and other neighbours are subject to a catalogue of anti-social behaviour. There is loud music and DIY noise. The gardens and property are untidy because of hoarding. There is drug use and drug dealing with a steady stream of visitors which is intimidating for the residents, and their property has been damaged on more than one occasion. For local residents, this anti-social behaviour has deeply affected them:

  • disturbed sleep because of the noise
  • health affected by the stress of the situation and the lack ofsleep
  • fear once their property became vandalised
  • the value of their homes has gone down thanks to the appearance of the neighbour’s property with the hoarding.

At the start we appealed to our neighbour in a friendly manner but this did no good. Environmental Health has been involved for a very long time too. Also the police are now involved because of the drug dealing and damage to our property.” James explains.

The case is in the system. He is in it for the long haul.

Our Analysis

James has done everything right. First of all he tried to speak to his neighbour about the problem. When that didn’t work, he contacted Environmental Health because the issues were noise and hoarding. These are dealt with by the Council. Once drugs and vandalism were added to the list of ASB the police, as we would expect, got involved. The problems are not yet resolved but the correct agencies are involved. It really is a case of being ‘in it for the long haul’.

This will feel frustrating and unfair – and it is. You never choose to be a victim of anti-social behaviour. Someone recently commented on our Facebook page that they wish they had never reported the anti-social behaviour in the first place. We completely understand their sentiments – to get results you will need to be involved in the case, giving evidence, and potentially a target of retaliation for speaking up.

Yet you also have to look at the alternative. We need to be tolerant of our neighbours. Yet if their behaviour starts causing us distress and affecting our health, it has definitely become anti-social. Surely it is better to do something about it, even if it will involve a long haul, rather than suffering in silence. Neither option is appealing.

Victims of anti-social behaviour have not chosen to be victims. It has happened to them and they can choose to face it or suffer in silence. It will take a long time to resolve so don’t leave it too late to bring it to the attention of your local agencies. We trust that there is light at the end of the tunnel for James and that in time he and his fellow neighbours can put this nightmare behind them.

Prisoner in own flat

I have lived in a darkened flat for 2 years now. It takes a phenomenal effort to get out even to the local shops. David, London

David has experienced years of anti-social behaviour, of huge variety from loud music to problems with dogs, fireworks being set off late at night and having his door kicked down.

He lives in a Council house and has raised the situation to all the main agencies, including to the ombudsman twice and more recently activating the Community Trigger.

“I have lived in a darkened flat for 2 years now. It takes a phenomenal effort to get out even to the local shops. I have to meet an escort from my block, the only friend I have left who is brave enough to keep visiting me. I have bars on all windows. My already poor health has been worsened to the point of being admitted into hospital.”

[Source: online survey]

Tired and frustrated at lack of Support

“Discovering that no authority had the right to enter the property and turn off the music which had been left playing was extremely shocking and demoralising. If you cannot find respite from the world at home where does that leave you?” JA, Leicester

JA  owns his house but it soon became a place where could no longer feel at home, thanks to the behaviour of his neighbours. They played music loudly at all times of the day and into the early hours. Once they left music playing and left the house for the evening. The authorities had no right to enter the property and stop the music making life unbearable for JA.

The neighbours were also spitting from the 3rd floor of the house into the yard, foul and abusive language. “We were tired and frustrated at the lack of support. Discovering that no authority had the right to enter the property and turn off the music which had been left playing was extremely shocking and demoralising. It could have continued for months day and night….. If you cannot find respite from the world at home where does that leave you?

Finally the original problem tenants were moved. Yet JA has new problem neighbours, talking loudly through the night until 5 am. They are waiting for similar action to be taken.

[Source: online survey]