PRESS RELEASE: Major gaps in support for victims of anti-social behaviour

Major gaps in support for victims of antisocial behaviour, report finds

Despite an estimated 8.2 million anti-social behaviour (ASB) incidents taking place each year, less than a quarter (23%) of victims of antisocial behaviour in England, and only 38% of victims in Wales have access to the support services they need, a report by the charity ASB Help reveals.

The ground-breaking research provides the first comprehensive map of the independent anti-social behaviour support available to victims across England and Wales. The report highlights the value of the practical help and emotional support that is being provided through locally-commissioned Victim Support projects in some areas.

In Newcastle, Leeds, Nottinghamshire, Somerset and Tower Hamlets dedicated anti-social behaviour teams are working with victims while in 25 other areas Victim Support is providing ‘Victims Champions’ to help people cope with their experiences. However, the patchy provision and funding across the country means that a staggering 43 million people do not have access to such specialist independent antisocial behaviour services.

The report by ASB Help calls for a national minimum standard of support for antisocial behaviour victims, for local authorities and Police and Crime Commissioners to fund more local projects, and greater support for victims who are seeking redress through the civil courts. It also suggests that new government anti-social behaviour legislation would be improved if victims were given a clearer route to getting help.

Jennifer Herrera, Chief Executive Officer of ASB Help said: “Resolving anti-social behaviour often requires a multi-agency response and lines can be blurred as to who has responsibility for acting. Sometimes no one acts and the victim continues to suffer in silence. We believe an independent victim-focused point of contact like Victim Support ASB Champions is crucial for a victim-centred approach to tackling anti-social behaviour. We have confidence in signposting victims to such a service but this report shows that in many areas we do not have that option. We believe this urgently needs to change.”

Adam Pemberton, Assistant Chief Executive of the charity Victim Support said: “Antisocial behaviour can take on many forms, from littering and drunkenness to verbal abuse and threatening behaviour. It is often persistent and can shatter people’s lives and have a negative impact on the communities in which they live. “It’s clear from the findings of this report that there are massive gaps in support for people who are affected by antisocial behaviour, which must be addressed. A consistent approach to tackling this is needed. Agencies need to work together and learn from each other to ensure victims no longer fall through the gaps and have to cope with the torment of antisocial behaviour alone.”

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About ASB Help

ASB Help is a national UK charity seeking to assist victims of anti-social behaviour as to their rights – who they should report the anti-social behaviour to and crucially, what to do if they do not get a satisfactory response. Some areas of the UK have excellent resources to help victims of anti-social behaviour, including dedicated helplines. To find out more about ASB help visit: http://asbhelp.co.uk/

About Victim Support

Victim Support is the independent charity for victims and witnesses of crime in England and Wales. Last year we offered support to more than 1 million victims of crime and helped more than 198,000 people as they gave evidence at criminal trials through our Witness Service. Victim Support also provides the Homicide Service supporting people bereaved through murder and manslaughter and runs more than 100 local projects which tackle domestic violence, antisocial behaviour and hate crime, help children and young people and deliver restorative justice. The charity has 1,400 staff and 4,300 volunteers and is celebrating its 40th anniversary during 2014. To find out more about Victim Support visit: https://www.victimsupport.org.uk/

ASB Help Report Effective Support November 2014